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alternative development Archives | Educate for Life

Bal sansad - Children's Parliament at School

First session of Bal Sansad – The Children’s Parliament

By child initiative
Our newly formed Hunar Ghar Bal Sansad – Children’s Parliament convened its first meeting discussing roles and responsibilities of each member and setting up prospects. The platform gives children the opportunity to voice their opinions and become key decision makers for the school as well as the local community.

Rahul Dubey, our Rural Changemaker who is instrumental in initiating the activity shares his thoughts and expectations… Read More

Architecture as part of the learning process at Hunar Ghar

By Uncategorized

I recently asked Teddy to write a little about what good education meant to him. Although we do a lot more than run a school, learning and personal development is at the heart of it all. Below, Teddy explains how he interprets the relationship between school learning, the school environment, and the role of the wider community at large in learning. Teddy writes:

 

1/ KEY POINTS FOR A GOOD LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

When I was young, I wanted to be an architect…

The message delivered by my parents was clear : if you want to fulfill your dreams, you have to work well at school ! Which parents don’t say that to their kids ?! In a good proportion, it is a necessary pressure : Not enough, kids could take it too easy; too much, the pressure becomes insupportable.

Although, and it is the case anywhere, education has two origins : the one learnt at school and the one taught by parents. Both are complementary. One missing, and it is the all system of schooling that becomes unbalanced, and the chance to have kids « uneducated » or « bad educated » as we say, is higher. So, the transmission of knowledge from school and the transmission of values from families are the 2 main issues of children education to me.

Well, once we said that, the question could be : what is a good learning environment ? As an architect, I could simply and truly say that a good architecture made a good learning environment, especially true in remote area. Everybody is agree to say that a comfortable space to learn make kids more focus or more happy to learn, at school or at home. As adult, that’s what we think, and WE think like that for kids as well…

Concretely, let’see how it is going at Hunar Ghar :

Recently, and I would start by that because it is a wonderful progress, the Women Group is born. To me, it is the beginning of what it was missing at Hunar Ghar : parents education, to re-balance the system of schooling.

It is to me the first condition of a good learning condition : a school that teaches well and in a clever way like Hunar Ghar does and families aware of the work they ALSO have to do in term of education.

The first equation is simple :

GOOD school teaching + family responsibilities = GOOD learning SPIRITUAL environment

After this point, we could naturally say that it is enough, we could finally say that it is all what kids need to try to reach the « good education ».

Some people would say that a classroom is a classroom and there is no way it can contribute to kid better education. The other like me and EFL think that a well designed classroom and by extension a school is already a future success in term of education.

Our kids have the right to have nice schools, with all facilities such as cafeteria, library, playground, and so more to create a perfect environment of individual and collective mind development. So why every kid around the world wouldn’t have the chance to use this types of facilities? I mean, do the kids of Hunar Ghar deserve less good learning accommodation than the other small westerners ??

The second equation is as simple as the first one :

GOOD school teaching + GOOD INFRASTRUCTURE = GOOD learning PHYSICAL environment

 

2/ A SCHOOL NOT LIKE A SCHOOL

Since ever, architects design « beautiful », « interesting », « new » buildings in the hope that it gonna make users ( and themselves ) happy : happy that the construction is finally completes after a so long time and so much effort put into it; happy to get a beautiful building seen and liked by everybody, happy to use it comfortably like expected;…

The user is the structural key of the entire process, so building an architecture for kids force to a complete rethinking of the space. It is a basic return to the origins of a building, to its interior and exterior environment, which may be defined a places of total learning for young people. The perception of space that kids have vs the one adults have is totally different due to their mind ( not mature yet ) and their physical ( still small ).

Finally, what we try to create at Hunar Ghar is not a feeling of school ( adult perception of this institution ) but more a feeling of community ( kid perception of a living area ). That’s why it is a successful place to learn because kids don’t have the pressure of « to be at school » : the landscape, the school planning and the architecture make easier the sens of sharing : kids are not at school but in a place of exchange, a place of learning the life, a place of interaction as complex as it can be in an develop urban context. It is not because the situation takes place in a remote area that things cannot be complex ( in a good meaning ) : the classroom units spray on the site generate a flow of kid circulation very important to make alive the site : they use the existing stairways but they are also free to experiments other ways that their imagination can create. They are the actors of their own site.

In the theory of architecture, a circular space has always been seen as a very spiritual space, almost holy because of its heaven connotation; a space where everything is possible; a space of the imaginary rather than the real. On earth, people prefer straight walls with angles because it is more easy to furnished and live in. Which is understandable. But for Hunar Ghar, EFL tried to make circular space as a chance for kids to share a common education and be involved as the main caracters ( circular feelings : kids have the middle position so the most important ) rather than square spaces where kids look on the teacher on the same direction ( square feeling : kids are spectators and not actors ).

So the architectural choice of having round classrooms rather than square has also an impact on the learning environment : it can be interpreted as a space where the kid’s interaction is the most developed because the room has no corner and they face each other rather than look the teacher on the same direction, ignoring each other.

kids-students are the most important entity in the process of creation of a school. If they don’t have the central position, the design cannot be relevant.

How many kids hate going to school ? They rarely say that it is because the corridors are too wild, or the ceiling is too low, or that walls are too dirty. But we all get these impressions when we were young. As an architect, I cannot stop thinking that the quality of the concept and the quality of the construction have their own part of responsibility in the kid education…

 

3/ LEARNING FROM THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE SCHOOL

At Bakhel, the school is located in a place where climate leads to a very free use of space, one does not require intrusive technologies, but rather clear acts, which can be summarised in the protection from sunlight and in the attempt to convey air within certain limits.

Here at Hunar Ghar, the architecture presented itself primarily through the search of shadow and wind, primitive materials that, because of their essentiality, can become didactic media for children.

The engagement of the local population is an extraordinary method of connection with the territory in its institutions, such as school : in this way, the children learn the link between study and emancipation, between manual building and design, and cultures, efforts leading them to imagine a better world; the self-building, the dialogue with the population, the contact with apparently different worlds, contribute to a solid education for the kids, who are thus encouraged to see the school as a living space, as a physical manifestation of its students and teachers. Le Corbusier said : our task ( the one of architects ) requires the participation of everyone, in an orderly way, and not topsy-turvy : hierarchically and not denatured by artificial doctrines ( when the Cathedrals were white : a journey to the country of timid people )

Concretely, when we built the 3 last classrooms with a new way of construction ( bamboo for the roof or multi-windows for the walls ) the idea was obviously to show to people that another way was possible. Because in the local area, everything that people learn is mostly based on personal experience, get involved local villagers into the process of construction made then directly and concretely learn different methods. Then, having kids watching the job-site and sometimes helping for tiny tasks made them understand why the system of schooling is important. Also, seeing me, a foreigner, everyday at school, could give to kids this energy and desire to explore areas further than the one hour close-by city…

Finally, the best learning environment is the one that give hope and dreams to students. These dreams that can become true thank to the education. Having kids happy to come everyday at school with a strong open-mind and independence is definitely due to the quality of the learning environment : what it is taught ( education ) in a good environment ( architecture ) with the support of the local communities ( integration )

Experimentation around India

By Uncategorized

I just came across this article on the Unicef website, about a programme launched in partnership with the Bihar government for providing a chance to children to work through the primary education curriculum in a verticalised way, that allows the kids to work at their own pace.

We do something similar at Hunar Ghar in the afternoons, when we set the more integrated projects aside and focus on subject based learning, so it would be interesting to have a look at the materials the UNICEF have put together and see how applicable it is for us.

More that this though, it’s heartening to see other organisations around India working to produce higher quality materials in Hindi and local languages to meet the learning needs of rural kids and sharing their work online through blogs etc. There doesn’t seem to be enough monitoring, evaluation & sharing of experiences from experimental educational establishments around India, something that is crucial reforming rural education to make it child and community centred.